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Fragrance evolves into sanitizer: Fueguia 1833 takes the leap

Laura Hendrikx

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Fragrance evolves into sanitizer: Fueguia 1833 takes the leap

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With northern Italy one of the hardest hit regions in the Covid-19 pandemic, nearly 100 fragrances from Milanese brand Fueguia 1833 are now available for sale online in sanitizer versions. A first in the perfumery market.

Julián Bedel, founder of Fueguia 1833, has had this project in mind for years, so when the lockdown gave him more time to devote to R&D, he jumped at the chance to launch a line of his existing fragrances in sanitizer versions, dubbed the Bioactive Molecules collection.

Bedel wondered, in view of the health crisis, how the plants he worked with on a daily basis could be beneficial. Based on scientific studies showing the antiviral and antibacterial properties of some of the Argentinian plants the brand works with, Fueguia 1833 developed a reactant composed of 45 species of plants that are said to have a synergistic effect when combined. Bedel also studied the extraction methods, which are crucial for preserving the active compounds in the final product. 

While all of the brand’s fragrances feature a 70% alcohol content and therefore have disinfectant properties, it is the addition of this plant blend that makes the difference between the Bioactive Molecules collection and Fueguia 1833’s other perfumes. But there is also the addition of a surfactant (soap) and chlorine dioxide when formulating the new range. 

Given that chlorine dioxide is an unstable gas, the juice is protected from ultraviolet and infrared rays by the black glass made by Swiss company Miron. For the bottle, a cylindrical shape was chosen, which is more functional, while the pump produces a larger spray that is better suited to application on textiles.

While Bedel describes the formula as a "super potion", he points out that it is still a fragrance and belongs to the family of cosmetics and not medicine. Its effectiveness has not been scientifically tested, as these kinds of tests demand an extended time frame to be effective. 

And how does he see the collection’s potential post-coronavirus? "It will continue to work well because the ‘sanitizing’ issue will remain in people's minds," he assures. So much so that he is preparing the launch of a line of bioactive cosmetics, namely serums and haircare products in the form of nano emulsions, which will first be marketed in Japan, in the new shop the brand plans to open in Kyoto in May, its third boutique in the country. This will serve as a test. After all, Bedel concludes, "If we can make it in Japan we can make it everywhere".

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